Photo Gallery 6

 

 

Tule thatched house and shade shelter at Sunol-Ohlone Regional Wilderness in Sunol, California.
© D. Labiste 1998-2003

 

 

Bark house and roundhouse (front and side view) at Indian Grinding Rock State Historic Park, California.
© D. Labiste 1998-2003

 

 

Gathering dogbane (Apocynum canabinum) for a dogbane net.
© D. Labiste 1998-2003

 

 

Lei niho palaoa style necklaces
Produced by KAHIKO Arts.
© D. Labiste 1998-2003

 


Two replicas of diigubuhu toys made out of tule. The original, which resides at the Brooklyn Museum, was made by Susanna Graves (Pomo) in 1906. Diigubuhu is the Eastern Pomo word for a water bird, the American bittern.

When a predator approaches its nest, the least bittern stretches its neck (which is colored like the surrounding withered reeds), thrust its beak upward, and sways gently like reeds in the wind. Also, the dark and light lines on bitterns help them to blend in with vertical shadows cast by the vegetation they live in.
© D. Labiste 1998-2003 (1st photo only)

 


 

Photo Gallery 1

Photo Gallery 2

Photo Gallery 3

Photo Gallery 4

Photo Gallery 5

Photo Gallery 7

Photo Gallery 8

Photo Gallery 9

Photo Gallery 10

PHOTO GALLERY II

PHOTO GALLERY III

PHOTO GALLERY IV

View "Friends of Primitive Technology" past activities

 

 

E-mail your comments to "Dino Labiste" at KahikoArts@yahoo.com
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